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10Plates.JPG | Hits: 7389 | Size: 40.88 KB | Posted on: 4/6/06 | Link to this image


$45 shipped by USPS Priority in the US. Each about 10-13" front-to-back and just over 3 ridges wide (as shown), so they'll cover a hole less than 8" long & 3 ridges wide. Includes self-drilling screws & mastic sealing tape. For info on purchasing one, e-mail me thru my profile here.

As of June 2015, I'm sold out.


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FPAccessKit.JPG | Hits: 2829 | Size: 49.27 KB | Posted on: 8/3/12 | Link to this image


Access Plate Kit

Plate length (front-to-back) varies, but all are more than 3 ridges wide. This shows black butyl rubber sealant, which is the same as the factory transmission tunnel cover sealant. One extra screw is included.



$45 shipped by USPS Priority in the US. For info on purchasing one, e-mail me thru my profile here. Each about 10-13" front-to-back and just over 3 ridges wide (as shown), so they'll cover a hole less than 8" long & 3 ridges wide. For info on purchasing one, e-mail me thru my profile here.

As of June 2015, I'm sold out.

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82Plates.JPG | Hits: 2614 | Size: 61.84 KB | Posted on: 8/2/12 | Link to this image


Raw cover plates cut from my old '82 body tub.

I'll clean up the rough edges, drill the screw holes, and package them with sealant & screws. Even the smallest is more than large enough to do the job. The longest & shortest ones are SOLD.

As of June 2015, I'm sold out.

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FPAccess.jpg | Hits: 5836 | Size: 20.71 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


Installation of fuel pump access hole cover panel. Before cutting, make sure your new cover plate will span the hole enough for its screw holes to hit the bed that remains.

Instead of a foam seal, I ended up choosing a reusable caulk-type sealant; usually Tacky Tape.


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Disco Fuel Pump.JPG | Hits: 7849 | Size: 77.37 KB | Posted on: 8/6/03 | Link to this image


Factory fuel pump access on a Land Rover Discovery & Discovery Series II. This is the idea behind this mod, and MANY vehicles are factory-built with a removable access plate over the fuel tank.

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01BeforeAfter.JPG | Hits: 4645 | Size: 77.21 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


Because of my jump seats, it's easier for me to roll the floor cover from the front. But for most Broncos, the fastest way is to remove the t/g threshhold & roll it from there forward to the rear seat strike cup.

It looks the same before & after this procedure.

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01BeforeB.JPG | Hits: 4299 | Size: 54.53 KB | Posted on: 11/5/09 | Link to this image


This '93EB was abaondoned for ~6 years, resulting in (among MANY other problems) a seized fuel pump.

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01BeforeC.JPG | Hits: 4306 | Size: 71.65 KB | Posted on: 11/5/09 | Link to this image


For most Broncos, like this stock '93EB, only the rear threshhold has to be removed to fold the carpet forward and expose the target area of the cargo floor.

Note the remains of the build sheet in the lower R corner. Oddly, this Bronco doesn't have the typical bare spot where the tailgate access panel was laid during painting.

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02Bolts.JPG | Hits: 4505 | Size: 80.18 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


Since I applied anti-seize lube when I installed them years ago, these bolts are easy to remove now; even with this cheapo cordless impact. Most Broncos have so much rust in these threads that the bolts can't be removed without a torch.

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01Tools.JPG | Hits: 5933 | Size: 68.77 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


This procedure will make accessing the fuel pump or fuel level sender in any fullsize Bronco much easier, since the tank won't have to be dropped again. These tools aren't necessarily the best-suited to this job; a drill with a 1" hole saw (or step drill bit) & a jigsaw with a metal-cutting blade might be better. You'll also need a replacement floor plate slightly larger than your access hole to put back.

Earplugs & goggles are good, too, but the ladder isn't necessary. :-)

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02Welds.JPG | Hits: 5999 | Size: 50.04 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


Locate the line of spot welds holding the bed down on the body mount channel. The lip of the channel extends about 1/2" rearward of these welds. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam's lip under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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03Welds.JPG | Hits: 5519 | Size: 40.53 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


This shows the welds' locations in relation to the lip of the channel. Cut behind this lip; the front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank.

This truck has a body lift, which is why there's so much room here.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact this beam under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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04Tape.JPG | Hits: 6092 | Size: 58.01 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


The front of the hole (at the back of the channel's lip) should be no more than 26" forward from the back of the bed. The back of the hole depends on the size of the cover plate you have, so DON'T CUT THE HOLE until you have a repair plate in-hand. The sides of the hole should be at the upward bends in the lowest points of the bed ridges so that any fuel or debris will be easy to sweep into the hole. But don't cut into the flat bottoms of the ridges since the cover panel screws have to hit this area. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam's lip under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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03Check.JPG | Hits: 4572 | Size: 68.71 KB | Posted on: 11/5/09 | Link to this image


Find the line of spot welds, place the plate where it will go, then trace across its front & rear edges. (Ignore the sides.) Make the cuts AT LEAST 1/2" INSIDE these marks so the screws will hit good metal. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank or at least the vent hose.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam's lip under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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05Start.JPG | Hits: 5230 | Size: 56.44 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


A 4 1/2" angle grinder with a thin wheel is probably the easiest BUT MOST DANGEROUS way to make the initial cuts. A drill or hole saw is probably a better choice since it leaves a rounded corner, reducing the chance of a stress crack or tear.

If using a wheel, remember that it sprays red-hot steel either up into the truck, or down onto the fuel tank. Since this truck had no camper shell or interior, I let it fly up & wore safety goggles & ear plugs.

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03Hol.JPG | Hits: 4174 | Size: 76.57 KB | Posted on: 11/5/09 | Link to this image


Sketch the cut line corners INSIDE the trace lines, and along the crease in the bottom of the channel. Then place the hole saw upside-down along the corner lines & mark the center. I prefer to predrill the center so the saw doesn't grab when the drill breaks through. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank or at least the vent hose.

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03Hole.JPG | Hits: 4005 | Size: 50.46 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


NOT following my own advice, I didn't trace the cover plate onto the floor first. This first hole is placed correctly. Using a hole saw leaves a rounded corner that reduces stress, but it's probably not significant. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank or at least the vent hose.

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03HoleK.JPG | Hits: 4142 | Size: 72.05 KB | Posted on: 11/5/09 | Link to this image


The rear holes are noticeably closer to the gas tank than the front, so don't punch down when the drill/saw breaks through.

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04Holes.JPG | Hits: 4016 | Size: 51.49 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


NOT following my own advice, I didn't trace the cover plate onto the floor first. The front L hole is slightly too far forward, but it's still good enough for the cover plate I have. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank.

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06Cut.JPG | Hits: 5167 | Size: 70.42 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


If you use a saw, make SURE you don't puncture the gas tank or cut the fuel lines & wires. Even if it doesn't catch fire, it's still expensive to replace. This body is on 3" lifts, and this blade would still hit the tank if I wasn't careful. A jigsaw with a short metal-cutting blade is a much better choice.

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05SawCheck.JPG | Hits: 3943 | Size: 46.02 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


Before ripping through the tank, I checked the depth against the fully-lowered blade. At the rear L corner, there was ~1/4" interference. To clear the tank, I simply tilted the saw. Another option would be to position the blade at its maximum UP stroke, then mark & break it off ~3/4" below the saw's shoe.

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06Sawed.JPG | Hits: 3976 | Size: 74.74 KB | Posted on: 11/5/09 | Link to this image


Be aware of the distance from the floor to the tank at all times, and remember that the fuel lines, pump wiring, and vent hose are in there.

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06Saw.JPG | Hits: 3915 | Size: 56.8 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


The front edge has the most depth clearance for the tank & fuel lines, so I cut it 1st. The lip (visible in the front L hole) juts rearward ~1/8" here, but I cut both layers. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank or at least the vent hose.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam's lip under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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07Size.JPG | Hits: 5113 | Size: 47.68 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


This is about where the hole should be. DO NOT CUT everything out like this pic shows - I'm harvesting the floor from this body to make cover plates. Trace around your replacement plate, and cut INSIDE it so you have room to screw it down, which should be approximately the size of the white rectangle. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank or at least the vent hose.

If you're unsure, cut LESS out than is necessary. Once you can see the target, cut more in the direction you want until you have the smallest hole positioned just where you need it to disconnect the lines & pull the pump assembly out. Never cut more than 3 ridges wide, or longer than 3/4" SHORTER (front-to-back) than the cover plate.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam's lip under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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08Size.JPG | Hits: 5597 | Size: 54.75 KB | Posted on: 4/5/06 | Link to this image


This is where the hole should be. DO NOT CUT everything out like this pic shows - I'm harvesting the floor from this body to make cover plates. Trace around your replacement plate, and cut INSIDE it so you have room to screw it down, which should be approximately the size of the white rectangle. The front edge of the hole can be an inch or so behind the welds if your cover plate is short, but the farther back the rear edge is, the more likely you'll cut the tank or at least the vent hose.

If you're unsure, cut LESS out than is necessary. Once you can see the target, cut more in the direction you want until you have the smallest hole positioned just where you need it to disconnect the lines & pull the pump assembly out. Never cut more than 3 ridges wide, or longer than 3/4" SHORTER (front-to-back) than the cover plate.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam's lip under the floor. To avoid that, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines so there's enough good floor between the beam lip & the hole for the screws to catch.

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07Sawed.JPG | Hits: 3908 | Size: 52.91 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


I tilted the jigsaw for the remaining 3 cuts to ensure I didn't puncture the tank below.

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08Open.JPG | Hits: 4293 | Size: 58.51 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


If you look closely in the shadow at the top, you'll see that I cut the vapor hose. Fortunately, it's easy to repair. I missed everything else, except that slight rubbing at the rear L corner (top R of the pic). If the edges are very rough, dress them with a file to reduce the chance of cutting your hands while working on the pump.

At this point, the top of the tank can be vacuumed &/or washed to remove all dirt & shavings from the locking ring groove. Anything that remains could fall into the tank when the pump is removed, so vacuum or blow it empty.

Before attempting to disconnect the fuel lines on a '92-96, read this caption:


Older fuel lines are much easier to remove.

Once they're off, and the plate is clean, use a non-sparking (brass) drift & hammer to turn the lock ring CCW. If it's stuck, the only acceptable lubricant is CLEAN MOTOR OIL. No penetrating oil; no silicone lube; no grease; no WD40.

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10DoubleCheck.JPG | Hits: 3754 | Size: 51.08 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


A quick way to make sure the plate will cover the hole. All the screw holes in the plate should be visible around the floor scrap. If not, YOU GOOFED.

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09Open.JPG | Hits: 4337 | Size: 69.11 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


The lock ring is ~5" across, so a hole only 7" front-to-back is more than enough to work through.

Before attempting to disconnect the fuel lines, read this caption:


Older fuel lines are much easier to remove.

Once they're off, and the plate is clean, use a non-sparking (brass) drift & hammer to turn the lock ring CCW. If it's stuck, the only acceptable lubricant is CLEAN MOTOR OIL. No penetrating oil; no silicone lube; no grease; no WD40.

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11Narrow.JPG | Hits: 2492 | Size: 94.34 KB | Posted on: 5/24/12 | Link to this image


Even this is plenty of space to remove & install the pump, so don't cut a massive hole. Smaller is better for floor strength. And you CAN cut a short hole to be covered by a long plate, OR cut down a long plate to go over a short hole.

Before attempting to disconnect the fuel lines, read this caption:


Older fuel lines are much easier to remove.

Once they're off, and the plate is clean, use a non-sparking (brass) drift & hammer to turn the lock ring CCW. If it's stuck, the only acceptable lubricant is CLEAN MOTOR OIL. No penetrating oil; no silicone lube; no grease; no WD40.

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15aDistance.JPG | Hits: 4163 | Size: 71.95 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


Tank Clearances for standard body mounts in good condition (these are Energy polyurethane). Collapsed mounts will provide less clearance; a body lift will provide more.

If using a reciprocating saw (sawzall, jigsaw, etc.), consider the blade's MAXIMUM depth from the shoe. If using a cutting wheel, consider where the hot sparks are going.

Before attempting to disconnect this style of fuel lines ('92-96), read this caption:


Older fuel lines are much easier to remove, cut, and MELT.

Once they're off, and the plate is clean, use a non-sparking (brass) drift & hammer to turn the lock ring CCW. If it's stuck, the only acceptable lubricant is CLEAN MOTOR OIL. No penetrating oil; no silicone lube; no grease; no WD40.

For more about repairing the FDM or replacing the pump, read all the captions in this album:



For info about reparing the level sender, read these:


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16Screw.JPG | Hits: 3811 | Size: 61.48 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


After the repairs to the pump &/or sender, clean the floor around the hole, expose the sealant on the edge of the plate, & set it into place so all its screw holes are on the floor. Begin screwing it down from the middle ridge, working toward the flat sides.

Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam under the floor. To avoid this, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines.

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17Screwed.JPG | Hits: 3467 | Size: 61.91 KB | Posted on: 6/25/09 | Link to this image


Along the front edge, the screw tips MAY contact the beam under the floor. To avoid this, position the plate slightly rearward when marking the cut lines.

Tighten the screws enough to form a good seal, but don't strip them. If the drill tip breaks off a screw before its hole is drilled, swap it into an existing hole & reuse the good screw.

This was done on a hot day, so the sealant was squeezed out slightly.

After the floor cover is laid back down, this mod should be undetectable, even from below since the fuel tank hides it.

If future access is needed, remove the screws & pry up the plate. Heat will make it easier, and the sealant I use (Tacky Tape) can be reused indefinitely. It never cures, & only dries temporarily in extreme cold. Otherwise, it always has the consistency of chewed gum.



Butyl windshield sealant works equally well, but is slightly messier. It's what Ford used on the transmission tunnel plates in these trucks.

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PlateRemove.JPG | Hits: 2423 | Size: 95.58 KB | Posted on: 6/24/12 | Link to this image


If the plate ever has to be removed again, remove all the screws & pry up the sealant. It's MUCH easier on a hot day, but the goo will come off more-cleanly when it's cool.



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